Client testimonial..amzLenders

Client testimonial..amzLenders

“gro.team have been amazing. They have been really customer focused and have connected us with someone with very deep experience in the areas we need. They have shared the cost savings from remote working with us so they are actually very cost effective as well…” – Loraine Bautista amzLenders New York City USA.

Sound good to you? Give us a shout here.

gro.team are Now Deploying High Impact Interim Talent Remotely

gro.team are Now Deploying High Impact Interim Talent Remotely

Building on their high impact interim service gro.team are now deploying their high impact interim talent totally remotely.

Location is now no longer a barrier to getting the best expertise available – when you want it, where you want it…

As our latest customer put it…

“gro.team have been amazing. They have been really customer focused and have connected us with someone with very deep experience in the areas we need. They have shared the cost savings from remote working with us so they are actually very cost effective as well…” – Loraine Bautista amzLenders New York City.

Give gro.team a shout if you need something launched, fixed or changed or improved, gro.team think that the more people they help become successful the more successful they become.
gro.team #highROI interim talent without borders

A Definition Of Growth Hacking

A Definition Of Growth Hacking

A Definition of Growth Hacking

Growth Hacking is focusing down on one key metric (contact form submissions, basket check outs…whatever) and doing anything and everything across the usual IT/Marketing divide to rapidly grow that metric sooner rather than later.

“Hacking” means instead of spending lots of money interrupting lots of people with necessarily generic messages things of genuine interest/usefulness are put in front of very, very targeted groups of people

 If you need a quick intro to growth hacking have a look here and if you have a B2B product/service you want to growth hack start here

[su_pullquote]Example gro.team engagement

“The change the gro.team interim brought when coming in as Interim VP Engineering was “truly amazing”​ and “we started to feel we were firing on all cylinders”. The “How To Build a Billion Dollar App”​ book by George Berkowski[/su_pullquote]

Ready to growth hack? Need a hand? How much does interim B2B growth hacking cost?

Not that much actually. It depends on what the singular target is but to double/treble traffic, sign ups, customers or whatever we would need to do a three-five day deep dive with you followed by a campaign execution phase of one-ten days a month until the target is reached. That normally takes 2-6 months depending on the start and end points.

We won’t take an engagement unless there is an #highROI up for grabs and you will end up “hugely up on the deal”. We really think that the more people we help become more successful the more successful we become…

If any of this is of any any interest why not give us a shout on hello@gro.team or +44 (0) 800 246 5735 for a friendly informal chat about your biz dev needs?

At the time of writing gro.team is #1,#2,#3 and #4 on Google UK for “interim growth hacker” and we have lots of happy clients we can tell you about…

The B2B Growth Hacking Playbook – eBook Chapter One

The B2B Growth Hacking Playbook – eBook Chapter One

Download your free  “what is growth hacking?” chapter from our eBook “the b2b growth hacking playbook”  here

 

Ready to growth hack? Need a hand? How much does interim B2B growth hacking cost?

 

Not that much actually. It depends on what the singular target is but to double/treble traffic, sign ups, customers or whatever we would need to do a one-three day deep dive with you followed by a campaign execution phase of one-ten days a month until the target is reached. That normally takes 2-6 months depending on the start and end points.

 

We won’t take an engagement unless there is an #highROI up for grabs and you will end up “hugely up on the deal”. We really think that the more people we help become more successful the more successful we become…

 

If any of this is of any any interest why not give us a shout on hello@gro.team or +44 (0) 800 246 5735 for a friendly informal chat about your biz dev needs?

 

At the time of writing gro.team is #1,#2,#3 and #4 on Google UK for “interim growth hacker” and we have lots of happy clients we can tell you about…

 

Please also see the first second and third posts in our growth hacking series

Start-ups: 17 tips for starting out in 2017

The Best Things I Learnt as a First Time Entrepreneur (and wish I knew before)

Ratna Chengappa, interim CFO, gro.team


Start-ups: 17 tips for starting out in 2018

It’s another new year already and this young century has already seen change like no other.

With so many leaders out there in social media and so many new enterprises to watch and learn from, you would think that an ideal ‘win-win’ should come easy to the first time entrepreneur. Not always.

Media is flooded with great stories from superhuman billionaire entrepreneurs. They make a fascinating read, no doubt, but often I find they rarely address the practical issues and day-to-day problems experienced by the majority of mere mortal entrepreneurs like myself.

I love working with start-ups and am very fortunate to be currently working with two such ventures, serving as the CFO of gro.team, experts in Growth Hacking and C-level leadership, and my own new venture for 2017, Intelligraft, specialists in next-gen ERP and cloud solutions.

I learnt a lot before, during and after my first foray into entrepreneurship. Much of it was not something I could have prepared for, no matter how many business management seminars I attended or books and articles I read beforehand. I found it was not easy to get good advice on these matters, so I hope these 17 lessons, learnt the hard way, will help ease some the challenges you may face.

  1. Watch the money like a hawk:

    Are you making a profit? How much? How often? If not, why not?
    Make sure you have unrestricted and frequent access to all financial data (bank statements, financial KPIs, expenses, budgets and P&L reports), especially when others are involved. Focusing on revenue and sales alone can be misleading and can give a false sense of success. Profit (the bit that’s left over after deducting costs) is often the truest measure of how well you are doing. Of course, it can be hard to compute without the right tools (see point 6) and while many entrepreneurs dismiss the need to make a profit (often citing examples like Amazon and Uber) most companies need to, and should, make profits to have a serious shot at surviving and thriving.

  2. Collect your dues:

    It’s your money! Bill fast and chase arrears.
    It surprises me how many experienced business people whom I meet are adept at dealing with customers, sales and tech but let the mundane task of collecting “their” earnings slip. Always make sure that you have a well-managed cash-flow and sufficient operating reserves at hand – if you’ve earned it, collect it. Think of it like having enough fuel in the tank and no leaks, otherwise you will be stranded!

  3. Preserve your assets:

    If you can, move your excess capital into a separate account from the one you use for day-to-day transactions.
    It can be a simple and effective way to ring fence it so you need a formal board approval to use the extra capital. Also, it can help protect against falsely overestimating how much money you are really making (or losing) on a daily, weekly or monthly basis.
    With one windfall that we earned from a large deal, the board voted to invest in a high-yielding investment to protect this dormant capital while making it work for us at the same time.

  4. Sharpen your finance skills:

    It is possible to do well without an intricate understanding of corporate finance.
    In a 2007 TED talk, Sir Richard Branson jokes that he only recently learnt the difference between net profit and gross profit (after decades of building successful and enormous businesses). [ref: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3XQcdVp9sls]

    That is Sir Branson, though.

    For lesser-mortal entrepreneurs, it is a good idea to make sure that you understand the key financial factors which relate to your business.

    If you need a jump-start, grab a copy of Entrepreneurial finance – Steven Rogers. It is written in a simple and easy-to-follow style, and I quote from pg 2: “They [entrepreneurs] must realize that finance is not as difficult as it is made out to be. It must be used and embraced as it is one of the key factors for entrepreneurial success”.
    I personally found executive education to be extremely beneficial, helping me to sharpen up my business skills, however this takes some effort, planning and investment. But going to business school is not the only way – now there are even quicker and more direct options: lots of quick and cheap MOOCs, books and websites which you can easily avail of. At the very minimum, it is a good idea to understand your company accounts and key concepts like direct costs (of sale), gross profit, net profit and EBITDA. If you can go further, learn about funding strategies, taxation (including withholding taxes if you have foreign companies) and the mysterious topic of company valuation – topics which are really handy when securing investment, sharing profit, granting equity and planning exits.

  5. Budget wisely:

    Whether you are bootstrapping, or using investor’s money, use your resources well.
    A budget can be hard to devise and even harder to stick to. It is not necessarily an attractive way to run a start-up but will hold you in good stead. To emphasize this point let me simply quote an outstanding example from Bill Gates. “The thing that was scary to me was when I started hiring my friends and they expected to be paid. And then we had customers that went bankrupt – customers that I counted on to come through. And so I soon came up with this incredibly conservative approach that I wanted to have enough money in the bank to pay a year’s worth of payroll, even if we didn’t get any payments coming in. I’ve been almost true to that the whole time.” [ref: pg. 100 – What They Teach You at Harvard Business School – Philip Delves Broughton]

  6. Tool-up fast:

    Upshift to a professional finance platform as soon as you can, especially if your business is growing.There are plenty of cost-effective SAAS offerings available now, far more than when I started out a decade ago. You can get accurate, real-time and on-demand reports to easily assess your financial position without having to struggle with increasingly complex (and error-prone) spreadsheets and estimates, or having to wait for the annual accounts prepared by your accounting firm, usually several months after your financial year-end.Leveraging these tools effectively will help you cover the points mentioned above, and also empower you to make well-informed decisions.
    Look out for more on this in my next article.

  7. Strategise:

    Many entrepreneurs take the “Screw it. Let’s do it!” approach (ref: Losing My Virginity – Sir Richard Branson) – I was one of them.
    At some point, though, even when you are in the thick of it, you should invest time in defining and regularly refining your strategy, by sometimes abstracting yourself from day-to-day operations. Ask the important (and difficult) questions.
    For example – Are we performing better selling services or products? How much should we invest in product development and innovation vs consulting and services? How do we make money with those products and services – licensing, subscription, sales, or by some other deal structure? Is our goal to hold out, give it away for cheaply/free and try and sell once we have traction? Are we entering a mature and well established market and if so, how can we compete with the market leaders and/or first movers? What are the margins? What happens if a key technology we are relying on gets acquired? (This is what happened to us, with the Sybase acquisition by SAP – we were lucky to be able turn it to our favour).
    Obviously there are many more questions to ask, some more relevant to your business than others, and it is not possible to predict and analyse all future scenarios (Brexit and the recent demonetisation of the Indian currency, for example, seemed to take everyone by surprise), but it is certainly worth exploring and including the ones you can foresee in your game-plan.

  8. Plan for the best and the worst:

    Building a venture takes an enormous amount of drive, enthusiasm and up-beat determination. But there are always two sides to a coin and you can land on either one on any given day. Playing the devil’s advocate could be your saving grace. Don’t shy away from taking a pessimistic view when assessing risks and performance, and being ready to react and adapt should the worst happen.Especially before you find yourself at risk of losing your home, pension, life-savings and/or children’s college fund, which can happen sooner than you think, if you cling to non-viable ventures and investments, funding them yourself (David Brent: Life on the Road). You have to be brutally honest about how well your business is performing and knowing when (and how) to take action can be essential.

  9. Get good tax advice:

    Spend time investigating what the most tax efficient structure could be before you grow too large.A good set-up could be to have a local company to transact but an offshore holding company to retain profits and/or hold intellectual property. Locating yourself in a state with lower taxes could be another option. Be wary of transfer pricing and other subtle, but internally relevant operating costs. Get professional advice when setting up such structures – do it right the first time so you don’t lose sleep (and money) over tax issues later.

  10. Get good legal advice:

    Gentleman’s agreements, e-mails, personal favours, written assurances, verbal promises and friendly alliances are hard to enforce, and sadly, often forgotten – rely on them at your own risk. Just because you have a contract does not mean people will stick to it and enforcing such things in law is slow, risky, stressful and very costly. It is sad, but some can try to take advantage of this, so make sure you have the right processes and measures in place to identify, regulate and enforce things quickly, easily and up-front.Even if things don’t go according to plan, you will be in a better position if you made the effort to get legally enforceable contracts, agreements and resolutions in place, and stuck to them.Do it sooner rather than later. Shop around and find a good lawyer with reasonable rates and one that you are comfortable with and understands your business. You will be glad you did, especially if a crisis occurs.

  11. Approach the topic of equity with great care:

    If someone approaches you for an equity share, they need to bring something really special to significantly enhance the business. Cash injection, strategic partnerships and technical skills are usually not enough – all these can be borrowed, rented, hired or contracted in – and are usually not good enough reasons to give away equity. If they want a partnership, first try a dealership or reseller arrangement, so that they can prove the relationship works and is profitable.There are always exceptions, of course, which you need to judge carefully before committing.

  12. Don’t be in a hurry to share:

    If you have to give away equity, don’t do it too early and have a strategy defined up-front.
    This is a huge topic which is discussed at length in The Founder’s Dilemma – Noam Wasserman, but some basic tips are:
    a) Have separate classes of shares for different purposes e.g. Class A voting stock, Class B non-voting stock, Class C non-voting stock/non-dividend bearing, and so forth. Separate share classes are key because dividends and voting rights do not need to be equal across classes.
    b) Ensure you utilise vesting periods, options and exit terms to protect against people accepting them and quitting soon after.
    Some agreements have in-built termination clauses that withdraw share options when someone quits.
    c) Get a cast-iron share-holder agreement and have it registered in court officially by a lawyer – if things go wrong, this can be your only defense.
    d) Be very clear in all the main concepts (anti-dilution, anti-competition, drag-along/tag-along rights, unanimous agreement topics, inability to participate due to death or incapacity, enforced exit, etc.) – but beware, these can be used against you also.

And at the risk of repeating myself, get professional help! Sooner rather than later.

  1. Trust and respect your customers:

    Getting customer contracts signed can take a long time. And some can be really lengthy and complex, especially in highly regulated industries. In my experience, however, it is rare for a customer to use these complex clauses against you, so these can be less risky than your own internal dealings, especially with large well-known firms.
    Clients hired you because they want you to deliver. They prefer you do a good job in the first place, especially if they have been through a complex vendor selection process to get you on-board. So, it is worth being flexible to respect and accommodate the legal policies of such customers (who often cannot bend).At worst, if something goes wrong unavoidably, you need to fix it with skillful and pro-active management. And even some free/discounted remedial work. Keep things sweet and make sure you get paid and that they remain happy.

  2. When dealing with experienced investors be very wary:

    Professional investors know every trick in the book and more. They will try to get their pound of flesh (with blood), if not two!
    In my experience, even when reputable law firms are involved, you need to be careful – I found mistakes (possibly intentional) in contracts written by prestigious law firms which would work against me had I not spotted the errors and challenged them there and then. Impartial advisors can in fact be secretly biased. So please read up, stand your ground and be prepared to negotiate or even walk away, if they cannot agree to fair terms.

  3. Experienced hires don’t always deliver:

    When you are experiencing the challenges of scaling you may feel lost.
    It is tempting to hire someone more experienced than you who has worked on a larger scale, in the hope they can steer you in the right direction and help you reach new heights. Unfortunately, I found this does not always work out. Zipcar’s founder, Robin Chase, says it best: “Our mistake: hiring a big-company guy for a start-up. He spent a lot of money on lunches and parking, created huge lists and detailed tasks and procedures that were 25% out of date by the time they hit my desk and 50% out of date by the following day. He was used to working at a much later-stage company where the goal was to put procedures in place and follow them strictly.” [ref: Chapter 8 – The Founder’s Dilemma – Noam Wasserman]

  4. Individual motives may not always be in the best interests of the company:

    I had always assumed that like in sports, teams would align and focus on achieving a common goal. I was naïve.Unlike sports where the goal can be clear to all players (beat the other team), business goals can often have different meanings for different people. This can result in people tugging in different directions or forming competing factions and groups. This can be disastrous amongst a group of share-holders and board members. Even though I experienced this first hand, it is hard to say how to avoid this. It is possibly one of the trickiest challenges of all, as summarized in this quote “ Business is a constant process of keeping your own guard up – in fact, it is the only way to do business – while encouraging others to lower theirs.” [ref: Pg 16 – What They Don’t Teach You at Harvard Business School – Mark H. McCormack ]

  5. DO NOT neglect your health and family:

    I learnt this the hard way. It is so easy to put your business first and your family second. I made this mistake for many years – in my experience, no venture is worth ruining either, or both, of these for.


Launching or already running a business? Need help with leadership, growth hacking, coaching ¦ mentoring operations or tech?

Why not give us a shout on hi@gro.team or +44 (0) 800 246 5735 for a friendly informal chat about your biz dev needs?


Client testimonial..Andromeda

Client testimonial..Andromeda

“gro.team were very quick in making connections across the business areas and helping us to focus on the bigger picture. At the same time, they were proactive in creating concrete proposals to improve the team dynamic, processes and overall organisational design. They were helping us to build a first-rate product delivery function. gro.team combine a keen analytical approach with deep hands-on experience of end-to-end delivery in product/tech organisations. They are highly supportive in helping us to deliver results with pace.” – Muhammad Mehmood COO Andromeda

Sound good to you? Give us a shout here.

Growth Hacking – Definition Of Growth Hacking

Growth Hacking – Definition Of Growth Hacking

Growth Hacking – Definition Of Growth Hacking

Growth Hacking is focusing down on one key metric (contact form submissions, basket check outs…whatever) and doing anything and everything across the usual IT/Marketing divide to rapidly grow that metric sooner rather than later.

“Hacking” means instead of spending lots of money interrupting lots of people with necessarily generic messages things of genuine interest/usefulness are put in front of very, very targeted groups of people

 If you need a quick intro to growth hacking have a look here and if you have a B2B product/service you want to growth hack start here

[su_pullquote]Example gro.team engagement

“The change the gro.team interim brought when coming in as Interim VP Engineering was “truly amazing”​ and “we started to feel we were firing on all cylinders”. The “How To Build a Billion Dollar App”​ book by George Berkowski[/su_pullquote]

 

Ready to growth hack? Need a hand? How much does interim B2B growth hacking cost?

Not that much actually. It depends on what the singular target is but to double/treble traffic, sign ups, customers or whatever we would need to do a three-five day deep dive with you followed by a campaign execution phase of one-ten days a month until the target is reached. That normally takes 2-6 months depending on the start and end points.

We won’t take an engagement unless there is an #highROI up for grabs and you will end up “hugely up on the deal”. We really think that the more people we help become more successful the more successful we become…

If any of this is of any any interest why not give us a shout on hello@gro.team or +44 (0) 800 246 5735 for a friendly informal chat about your biz dev needs?

At the time of writing gro.team is #1,#2,#3 and #4 on Google UK for “interim growth hacker” and we have lots of happy clients we can tell you about…

One Tech Recipe for the Tech Leaders Out There

One Tech Recipe for the Tech Leaders Out There

Problem: So, we all know that big corporates are vulnerable to a bug known as: getting stuck in time and hard to change, this is just a generally accepted reality, so let’s try to debug this.

“Proof of concept” (a fun Hacking term) Fix: So because I come from the tech world, it’s fun for me if I will approach this dilemma using a fun computer hacking method, and let’s call it “Social engineering & Code injection” for now, just to make it fun sounding… and dual value is, you might learn how all the tech dots connect.

“Social engineering” (A fun hacking term):

  1. Observe and Define in your mind who has something to gain from a great new product that can disrupt and change the world.

  2. Observe and Define in your mind who thrives in selling and presenting.

  3. “Exploit” (A fun hacking term) those two elements to galvanise some excitement, by pointing out what kind of epically giant value tech can bring to their customers and therefore their business, which generates passion. Give examples such as Uber, Games like World of Tanks revenue which is bigger than numerous non tech giants combined, Self driving car tech, Electric cars will make going to a mechanic unnecessary, upcoming VR retail, Amazon’s food market moves will make physical food shopping reduce drastically etc.

  4. Because of 1 & 2, you are likely to have easily succeeded in 3. So now the next bunch of challenges come in. Keep reading.

  5. You are unlikely to have the above elements come with skill sets together with any tech delivery skills, so you will need to inject enough tech skills in to those elements just to make them barely useful in tech. This may be tricky but point 3 is helping you here, everyone is excited and wants to change the world. Passion == achieved, so you have good chances.

  6. Draw on the board some typical tech business roles and what they typically do day to day and why and then reference them via some reputable sources. Then try to get the elements 1 & 2 to play those roles (Product owner, Scrum master etc) in a rudimentary fashion. That’s all you need, providing you’re a tech leader, otherwise you’ll need to hire a tech leader who will take the venture by hand step by step.

  7. Now in the point 7 of the recipe you have to know tech or have a tech leader taking the lead. You(tech leader) will need to teach your given elements how to do a product owner job step by step and what a UX expert does, by letting them make mistakes and correcting them via tech logic possible/easy/hard/notpossible method, and turn their usually unhelpful power point and excel sheet presentations in to something that tech finds useful such as industry standard user stories and acceptance criteria, which is routed by a UX/UI expert & tech leader stakeholders.

  8. By this time you will have massive value visually observable by all involved so your strategic credibility is likely to be in good shape, so exploit that and now Teach the elements the point of Agile stakeholder method by demonstrating it in action. This might be tricky because Agile is known to bite elements with incompetency because it expects elements to actually focus on something useful to the delivery of the dream product as opposed to 1 element hiding behind massive amount of different tasks and making themselves appear invaluable while being totally and fully useless to the delivery of the product.

“Code injection” (a fun Hacking term):

  1. At the start gather the username/password for all of third party solutions which will likely be involved because other providers have spent years perfecting their solution which you can make use of. This may be tricky as all big corporates are filled with red tape, so we might need to hack this alone in the interest of delivery and then document them during the delivery, then hand them over at the end. For example: Twilio, Stripe, Paypal etc.

  2. As a tech leader, you need to influence the DB design before the delivery starts in such a way that it will enforce scalability and user stories you have come up with, once you do this, the developers will on the order of magnitude be more clear as to what the user stories are trying to achieve. For example: Table called “all_copy” or/and table called “all_emails” or/and table called “all_settings” <- Getting a pattern?

  3. Typing the code in is cheap (around $28 per hr) but what is hard is tech architecture, so ensure you have a tech architect to bounce theories around with even if you are gods gift to tech architecture, validation is everything. Also involve developers equally.

  4. At all times keep overseeing every super critical element, you have no choice now but to be the glue for everything, such as UX, Product & Tech architect etc., and ensure all decisions and debates are transparent and every developer is seeing them, because you cannot trust managers, they have no use in tech, and they are a single point of failure anyways due to single human memory factor which cannot be expected to be perfect. People don’t need to be managed in tech, management is an obsolete role, agile pin points incompetency instantly because agile roles are well documented.

  5. Set up collaborative task tools and get everyone transparently using agile tools and open communication methods where as much as possible everyone sees all comms, that way nobody can hide in the system.

So there you have it folks, a computer hack usually involves Social Engineering and some code to work, we successfully applied it to the physical world… Thanks for reading!

Achieving Consensus

Achieving Consensus

People in teams, from senior leadership down to tech and product teams, often believe that they are aligned around a particular direction and certainly usually aspire to be aligned.  But actually achieving real consensus is hard.  Here are some tips for getting there.

  • Get people in a room talking – don’t try to achieve consensus via email or networking tools

  • Commence the process by framing the topic and focus the discussion to ensure the group does not get side-tracked.

  • Get everyone to explain what they believe the strategy or direction to be, and get specific.  It’s easy for a group to sound aligned while the discussion is at a high-level but explaining what is actually meant can unearth differing interpretations

  • Identify underlying concerns and make sure everyone has the opportunity to speak

  • Distil the points on which the group agrees and isolate the outstanding concerns for further discussion and agreement – choose a direction

  • Play back to people what they have said and seek clarification that this is actually what was meant

  • Write points down in the session on a whiteboard and get the group to agree that this is what was meant – this often leads to further discussion and clarification

  • Send round a communication after the session confirming what was agreed, and if possible do a face-to-face communication to explain it to the wider organisation

  • Use the set of agreements in follow-up meetings and keep reinforcing what was agreed

If you need help in formulating a direction and getting consensus, please contact gro.team.

B2B Growth Hacking 3 of 4 – Finding Your Target Market

B2B Growth Hacking 3 of 4 – Finding Your Target Market

 

Getting Going

OK so you have a B2B product/service you want to growth hack and you have read the first and second posts in this series about B2B Growth Hacking and are ready to get going…fyi the fourth post in the series is here

 

Dipping Our Toe in The Water

We are going to need three things to get going;

1. To have an optimised destination for our growth hacking traffic.

2. A blog.

3. An initial idea of who our target market might be…

Once we have those three things we can start to test and learn on how to communicate with our target market most effectively.


Top Tip – start small. We want to be as targeted as possible as we start to test and learn so we need to break our problem down into manageable chunks.

For example…when Workteam started rather than starting with “SaaS software to increase employee engagement” (which it is) it picked one element of its’ offering, which was managing employee time off, and started with that. It was a much more manageable problem.

Top Tip – a blog is very, very important. It will be a great place to publish interesting/useful content 2-3 times a week and you can easily add a plugin to capture and add email addresses to your email list.

For example…when gro.team started we used SumoMe to automatically capture and add email addresses to MailChimp on our blog . The Pro version of SumoMe (which is needed to integrate to MailChimp) isn’t cheap at $29/month and they will bill you a year in advance.

B2B Growth Hacking – Setting Up A Landing Page and Goal

We need a landing page on our web site optimised for the search engine phrases we have chosen to point our traffic at that has the tags for Google Analytics and ideally Hotjar installed so we can see what happens when they get there (see the second post in this series).

We also need to define a goal in one or both of those tools so we can measure success.

We will eventually need a page per phrase but one page across all the initial phrases will be good enough to get going.

Once we have these things in place we can start to post some content and start testing…

 

B2B Growth Hacking – Finding Your Target Market

If you don’t have have existing content then you will need to create a post that says something interesting/relevant/useful/funny around the “need” your product/service is designed to fill.

 

Top Tip – video is very effective content and using sites like GoAnimate they are much easier to create than you might think. Make the soundtrack first and re-record until you’ve nailed it in one take. Then put the animation to the words. It will take about a day per minute to create great videos like this one from Workteam.

 

Remember to have a call to action (“CTA”) on your content and link to your optimised landing page. Once you have your content post it from your company page on Facebook and LinkedIn.


Top Tip –  publish your content as an article post on LinkedIn rather than sharing it as an update. It will appear in your connections’s notification feed and you will be able to access enhanced analytics about its’ reach.

Definition – Reach is usually defined as the total number of different people exposed, at least once, to a something (usually a piece of content) during a given campaign time period.

If you are starting from scratch you may need to spend £50-£100 on Facebook boosting your content to get enough reach. If so don’t target the audience – yet. Let’s start off with an unbiased sample.

Now we have content out there that should be relevant to our target market we can start to use the analytics capabilities in Facebook, LinkedIn and Google Analytics to learn about the reach and effectiveness of our content, and who and how people are responding to it.

 

Ready to growth hack? Need a hand? How much does interim B2B growth hacking cost?

Not that much actually. It depends on what the singular target is but to double/treble traffic, sign ups, customers or whatever we would need to do a three-five day deep dive with you followed by a campaign execution phase of one-ten days a month until the target is reached. That normally takes 2-6 months depending on the start and end points.

We won’t take an engagement unless there is an #highROI up for grabs and you will end up “hugely up on the deal”. We really think that the more people we help become more successful the more successful we become…

If any of this is of any any interest why not give us a shout on hello@gro.team or +44 (0) 800 246 5735 for a friendly informal chat about your biz dev needs?

At the time of writing gro.team is #1,#2,#3 and #4 on Google UK for “interim growth hacker” and we have lots of happy clients we can tell you about…

Please also see the first second and fourth posts in this series…